Symposium 2015: Do drones present a threat to individuals’ privacy and security?

Cartwright—The answer to the question is an unequivocal, “Yes.”  I love the idea of having drones used for police surveillance on criminals.  Hell, I even like having them armed to catch people who speed or run red lights and give them a ticket.  I certainly don’t favor drones in the hands of private citizens who want to invade their neighbors’ privacy.  This is one thing that needs to be stopped quickly and resolutely.  Local governments need to ban these just like they banned laser pointers.  No good will come from people having drones.  Ban them now.

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Symposium 2015: The last two presidential elections were rife with known voter fraud. How do we ensure that our elections remain open, free, and fair?

Cartwright—The instances of voter fraud in the last couple of elections is indisputable.  We had the whole Dallas Cowboys football vote in Ohio, even though I don’t think any of them were residents of Ohio.  Half of the Walt Disney character roster voted.  We have precincts where move votes were cast than there were registered voters.  And I was here in central Florida for the 2012 election.  We had a judge keep the polls open past established hours so that people could vote.  They were still voting the next day and the election was over.  All of this was fraud, but no has seemed to have an interest in investigating it and prosecuting the perpetrators.  Continue reading

Symposium 2015: Should the United States return to the gold standard or a similar standard?

Cartwright—Great concept, but this is not going to happen. It would be nearly impossible to return to the gold standard at this point without severely disrupting financial markets.  The dollar is strong right now against other currencies and inflation is relatively low.  Go back to World War I.  The US had double digit inflation for a couple years.  Same thing during World War II.  It’s nice to say that the gold standard would eliminate inflation but that’s not the case.  Economic history over the last hundred years or so doesn’t bear that out here.  Continue reading

Symposium 2015: How do we more effectively promote the use of alternative energy?

Cartwright—I’m all for the promotion of alternative energies, but this boils down to two things—economics and changing consumer behaviors in the form of incentives or disincentives.  I go back to my fuel surcharge and using part of the funds raised by that to invest in and promote alternative energies.  I think we should go off of the coast of just about every state and construct windmill.  Anyone who lives on the coast knows that those windmills would be turning all the time.  The government never does anything cheap or efficiently, so perhaps they offer up the opportunity to private industry with some sort of subsidy or tax credit funded by the fuel surcharge to build offshore windmills for energy purposes.  Do the same thing for businesses who are willing to build solar fields.  Continue reading

Symposium 2015: Torture or enhanced interrogation? How far is too far in dealing with terrorism?

Cartwright—I don’t think the terrorists are interested in torturing anyone.  They’re simply looking to cut off our heads, burn us alive, or cause as much death and destruction at one time as possible.  If you have a high ranking terrorist in custody and you know that he has information on a planned terrorist attack on a major city in America, how far would you be willing to go to get the information to stop the attack and save the lives of tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of innocent people?  Personally, I say do whatever it takes.  I’m not worried about the “rights” of terrorists or their mental state or their dignity or what other countries think.

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Symposium 2015: Is it time for a new round of campaign finance reform?

Cartwright—Good luck with this one.  Again, the political establishment is not going to let this happen.  They’re in too deep.  They’re selling their votes and peddling their influence left and right to special interest groups for huge sums of money.  It takes lots of money to run a campaign for federal office, whether it’s the House of Representatives, the Senate, or the President. The money has to come from somewhere for these massive and expensive campaigns.  This is partly the reason why it is so difficult to unseat an incumbent.  They usually have a massive war chest of campaign funds to use for advertising to crush most of the opposition.  This also leads to career politicians.  Why get out when you can live the high life in Washington on the taxpayer’s dime?   Continue reading

Symposium 2015: Are the Democrats and Republicans both becoming more extremist and does this give rise to a viable third party?

Cartwright—I’d like to point out to my friends here that we do have a third party in America.  It’s the Libertarian party, but unfortunately, it doesn’t get much attention though it does have a following.  However, the Republicans and the Democrats are never going to let third party candidates be successful.  This would upset their balance of power and they’re going to do whatever it takes to maintain their power and their control.  Continue reading

Symposium 2015: Has social media’s impact on society and the world done more good or more harm?

Cartwright—I think that social media has, in fact, made us less social.  Kids and many adults are glued to their cell phones and are unable to carry on conversations or interact in social settings.  Look at how many people these days, particularly the youth of America, are socially awkward and socially inept. Continue reading

Symposium 2015: Do schools need more authority to discipline students? If so, how do we accomplish this?

Cartwright—All of my colleagues here have hit on one important point, and that’s the lack of respect that kids today have for authority figures.  The school system suffers from the inmates running the prison.  That has to stop.  I’ve long advocated turning over the entire school system in the America to the military.  Let me be clear that I’m not saying we turn public schools into military schools.  I’m simply saying that the administration of the schools be run by the military.  Kids will be taught respect and manners, and if the parents need to be taught some respect and manners, they can be taught respect as well courtesy of America’s finest military personnel.  I think the military is pretty good at the whole discipline thing, don’t you?  Unruly kids in school would learn that their actions have consequences, and I don’t think they would want more than one dose of military discipline.  I think it would improve moral in the schools and make our schools safer for students, teachers, and administrators alike.  I think you would see an improvement in test scores because there wouldn’t be learning disruptions in the classrooms and habitually truant students would be getting paid a visit by a couple of MPs. Continue reading

Symposium 2015: Should all states mandate water conservation at some level?

Cartwright—I agree that mandates are problematic from a bureaucratic perspective, and I agree that the free markets should determine this.  I guess you could make an argument for a surcharge on excess water usage similar to the surcharge on gasoline that I proposed a few minutes ago.  This is a good way to influence consumption of water and the behavior of consumers when it comes to water usage.  Continue reading