Symposium 2015: Should open carry with appropriate background checks and licensing be permitted in all 50 states as a federal regulation?

Cartwright—I do believe that we should have open carry in each and every state for those individuals who have obtained an open carry permit.  This would be like a concealed weapon permit which requires classes and target practice in addition to substantial background checks.  If you can pass all of this, I’m all for it.  I think this would seriously reduce a lot of crimes in America.  Who’s going to walk into the liquor store and rob it if there’s ten people walking around with firearms on their hips?  Who’s going to walk into a restaurant or theater and start shooting if other people have guns?  Hell, I think this is a great solution to airline security as well.  Give every passenger who gets on the plane a pistol and have them turn it back in when they get off the plane.  How many hijackings do you think there would be if all the passengers were equally armed?   Continue reading

Symposium 2015: Now that same sex marriage has been legalized, is it time to legalize polygamy?

Cartwright—Since we’ve legalized gay marriage, it’s only fitting that we legalize polygamy which is another form of marriage.  At this point, only a hypocrite or a bigot would oppose legalizing polygamy.

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Symposium 2015: Should unemployment and welfare benefits be tied to community service?

Cartwright—Absolutely!  Why should we let people on welfare or unemployment sit around all day watching Netflix, playing video games, going to the gym, having sex, smoking dope, and doing nothing to contribute to society in a meaningful way?  These people are fully able to work, but many of them are just flat out lazy.  It’s become a lifestyle for them.  Why work when someone is willing to pay you to sit around and do nothing?  Continue reading

Symposium 2015: Is year round education good for student learning?

Cartwright—The more we can keep the kids in school, the better off we all are. If they’re in school, they’re not out roaming the streets getting into trouble or mischief.  I would think most parents would like this.  Who takes care of the kids in the summer while the parents are working?  Continue reading

Symposium 2015: Federal and state governments are rife with fraud and waste. How do we combat this? Is there any way to stop this?

Cartwright—My friend here is exactly right that we need to shrink the size and scope of the federal government, and for that matter, all levels of government.  There was a bit of an uproar a couple years back when you had the picture of the guy from the GSA sitting in a bathtub at some Las Vegas Hotel; there were some resignation and righteous indignation from the left and the right, but at the end of the day, a few top people were sacrificed and nothing more happened.  The federal government is rife with wasteful and fraudulent spending just like this and everyone knows it but no one has the willpower to tackle the issue.  Billions of dollars are wasted with Social Security and Medicare fraud each year, but we let it happen and we will continue to let it happen.  Continue reading

Symposium 2015: Do video games contribute to youth violence?

Cartwright—I’m not sure that video games directly cause youth violence, but I think it may bring out aggression and exacerbate mental disorders in some people.  Youth that go and do something violent already have something wrong with them.  They don’t sit and play a video game and then decide to have a sandwich before carjacking someone.  Those who do something violent are either influenced by their environments or they have a screw loose somewhere along the line. Continue reading

Symposium 2015: Should members of the Congress be allowed to gain financially from their positions? What should we do about this, if anything?

Cartwright-No, politicians should not be allowed to profit from public service, but the reality is that they do.  The statistics on the wealth in the Congress is staggering.  The median net worth is over $1 million.  You have people in the Congress worth $400-$500 million dollars, and you have only a handful who are of very modest net worth.  The reality is that the Congress is full of a bunch of high net worth individuals making decisions that benefit themselves more than anyone.  They’re out of touch with every day Americans, and they can’t relate to every day Americans from their ivory towers in the insulated world of Washington, D.C. Continue reading